Week 7, res/710


The anticipation is insane! I am very excited to challenge my learning next week with the analysis of my own survey. I am eager to get on the road to Phoenix for residency. This week is full of positive anticipation. My peer’s responses played a vital role in my comprehension of the required readings. For that, I am forever grateful. I am becoming more excited by the day to start developing my research. However, excitement comes doubt, and I am starting to question my research question and focus. I have spent a lot of time in the library, trying to see what other gaps can be identified. Then I start researching that topic for a while, considering the supportive research and similar studies. I feel excited, stressed, over, and underwhelmed.


I am finding more confidence in the SPSS program and my ability to understand the statistical output. I noticed about halfway through the week. I was developing the ability to make accurate assumptions of the data from the charts and tables. That was true in SPSS, but also in research papers, I was not reliant on the researcher’s explanation alone. Before that moment, I would require an open textbook, notes, and a quiet area of study to decipher the charts' information. I am excited to finally feel I am developing the ability to read the analytical output without extensive study.


I am capable of everything I put my mind to. Through scholarship, leadership, and practice, I am learning to balance my experience and development.


I was very sick this week, so I had a lot more time dedicated to study and research. I am proud of the time and practice I was able to gain this week. I have spent at least four days in relax mode, sipping warm tea, and reading textbooks. On a hilarious note, I had no voice this week. In fact, even still, it's little more than a sore and harsh whisper. So, the phone constantly ringing problem was completely solved. A personal lesson: My business is fine. Nothing exploded because I can’t speak… in fact, everything ran smooth and seemed almost more effective over email.


So, this cold has allowed me to realize that I can step back when I need academics. I’d say it was a great week.


An area of interest and thinking out loud


I have found the articles on organizational research-based in Police departments fascinating. It makes me wonder how long it takes organizations to adopt scientific inquiry-based suggestions? Vito, Suresh, and Richards (2011) reported the evidence of their study strongly supported police management showing strong support for servant leadership over autocratic and laissez-faire leadership styles in the grand mean values. Shane (2010) stated the officer's position was characterized as high demand and low control because of the authoritarian, military structure, and bureaucratic nature of the position. Both research studies appear to impress the need for positive change in the organizational policy in Police departments. I wonder when these studies will enact the positive change being requested?

Is there a gap that could be identified here? (thinking out loud).

Scientifically based research is loosely defined as systematic and empirical methods drawn from observation or experiment. Correctly implemented research will include rigorous data analysis, reliable, valid data, evaluated with comprehensive quasi-experimental or experimental designs, across studies by different investigators.

How many studies are required for a study to be considered scientifically supported? Ideas and thoughts are encouraged, although I am thinking out loud again.

Reference:

Shane M. Jon (2010) Organizational stressors and police performance, 38, 807-818

Vito, G. F., Suresh, G., & Richards, G. E. (2011). Emphasizing the servant in public service: the opinions of police managers. Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management,34(4), 674-686. doi:10.1108/13639511111180270

 © 1983-2020 by J.C. Quigley                         

+1 (915) 232- 9942   (Fax)

  • LinkedIn
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

+1 (657) 529-2420  (Office 1)

+1 (928) 271- 9402   (Office 2)